Heilong Martial Arts
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  Neijiaquan Kung Fu 内家拳功夫

Baguazhang 八卦掌  Taijiquan 太极拳 Xingyiquan 形意拳 

Tai Chi is a fighting art and system of exercise based on the philosophy of yin and yang-finding and using the balance between hardness and softness to overcome one’s opponent. Qigong literally means, “breathing exercise.”  The more popular exercise of Tai Chi is an advanced form of Qigong.  Modern medical research is now revealing Tai Chi and Qigong are powerful health sciences, as well as effective aerobic exercises.

 

In May 2009 Harvard Medical School Published a paper saying that:

“Tai Chi is often described as “medication in motion: but it might well be called “medication in motion” There is growing evidence that this mind body practice, which originated in China as a martial art, has value in treating or preventing many health problems. And you can get started even if you aren’t in top shape or the best of health.


In this low-impact, slow motion exercise, you go without pausing through a series of motions named animal actions – for example, “white crane spreads its wings” – or martial art moves such as box both ears.” As you move, you breathe deeply and naturally, focusing your attention- as in some kinds of meditation- on your bodily sensations.  Tai Chi differs from other types of exercise in several respects.  The movements are usually circular and never forced, the muscles are relaxed rather than tensed, the joints are not fully extended or bent, and connective tissues are not stretched.  Tai Chi can be easily adopted for anyone, from the most fit, to people confined to wheelchairs or recovering from surgery”

 

Studies have shown that Tai Chi can lower high blood pressure, and profoundly boost aspects of the immune system, while improving balance and coordination far better than any other known exercise.  Tai Chi can reduce or eliminate chronic pain and limited mobility, while lessening the incidence of anxiety, depression, or overall mood disturbances.  Tai Chi is the lowest impact exercise there is and has even been used by those with arthritis, yet as gentle as it is, it burns about 280 calories per hour, and provides roughly the same cardiovascular benefits of moderate impact aerobics


Like a precious diamond, Tai Chi has many facets.  As a health exercise it has no equal.  As a martial art it can be devastating, As a physical manifestation of Chinese Taoist Philosophy, it engages the mind to reflect upon the rhythms of nature and seek accord with them.  As a stress relieving therapy, it leaves the practitioner refreshed and centered, ready to face whatever difficulties their day or their life may bring.  It has been said that whoever practices Tai Chi diligently twice a day over a period of years, will attain the pliability of a child, the health of a lumberjack and the peace of mind of a sage.






According to the Harvard Medical Case Study

Some of the many health benefits of Tai Chi include:

Slows Down the Aging Process

Boosts the Immune System

Increases Breathing Capacity

Helps with Type 2 Diabetes

Reduces Asthma and Allergy Reactions

Reduces Anxiety, Depression and Overall Mood Disturbances

Helps with Arthritis, Rheumatism and Fibromyalgia

Helps Relieve Back Pain

Helps with Cardiovascular Respiratory Health

Helps with Circulation Problems

Helps with Heart Attack Recovery

Helps lower High Blood Pressure

Helps with Multiple Sclerosis

Helps with Osteoporosis

Helps Prevent Shingles

Helps relieve symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Helps Alleviate Stress Responses

Improves Balance and Coordination Twice as well as the Best Balance –Conditioning Exercise

Provides the lowest-Impact Weight –Bearing exercise know.

Helps with Heart Attack Recovery

Helps lower High Blood Pressure

Helps with Multiple Sclerosis

Helps with Osteoporosis

Helps Prevent Shingles

Helps relieve symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Helps Alleviate Stress Responses

Improves Balance and Coordination Twice as well as the Best Balance –Conditioning Exercise

Provides the lowest-Impact Weight –Bearing exercise know.





Other Studies have also show the medical benefits of Tai Chi:


Arthritis. In a 40-person study at Tufts University, presented in October 2008 at a meeting of the American College of Rheumatology, an hour of tai chi twice a week for 12 weeks reduced pain and improved mood and physical functioning more than standard stretching exercises in people with severe knee osteoarthritis. According to a Korean study published in December 2008 in Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, eight weeks of tai chi classes followed by eight weeks of home practice significantly improved flexibility and slowed the disease process in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, a painful and debilitating inflammatory form of arthritis that affects the spine.

Low bone density. A review of six controlled studies by Dr. Wayne and other Harvard researchers indicates that tai chi may be a safe and effective way to maintain bone density in postmenopausal women. A controlled study of tai chi in women with osteopenia (diminished bone density not as severe as osteoporosis) is under way at the Osher Research Center and Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Breast cancer. Tai chi has shown potential for improving quality of life and functional capacity (the physical ability to carry out normal daily activities, such as work or exercise) in women suffering from breast cancer or the side effects of breast cancer treatment. For example, a 2008 study at the University of Rochester, published in Medicine and Sport Science, found that quality of life and functional capacity (including aerobic capacity, muscular strength, and flexibility) improved in women with breast cancer who did 12 weeks of tai chi, while declining in a control group that received only supportive therapy.

Heart disease. A 53-person study at National Taiwan University found that a year of tai chi significantly boosted exercise capacity, lowered blood pressure, and improved levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and C-reactive protein in people at high risk for heart disease. The study, which was published in the September 2008 Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, found no improvement in a control group that did not practice tai chi.

Heart failure. In a 30-person pilot study at Harvard Medical School, 12 weeks of tai chi improved participants’ ability to walk and quality of life. It also reduced blood levels of B-type natriuretic protein, an indicator of heart failure. A 150-patient controlled trial is under way.

Hypertension. In a review of 26 studies in English or Chinese published in Preventive Cardiology (Spring 2008), Dr. Yeh reported that in 85% of trials, tai chi lowered blood pressure — with improvements ranging from 3 to 32 mm Hg in systolic pressure and from 2 to 18 mm Hg in diastolic pressure.

Parkinson’s disease. A 33-person pilot study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, published in Gait and Posture (October 2008), found that people with mild to moderately severe Parkinson’s disease showed improved balance, walking ability, and overall well-being after 20 tai chi sessions.

Sleep problems. In a University of California, Los Angeles, study of 112 healthy older adults with moderate sleep complaints, 16 weeks of tai chi improved the quality and duration of sleep significantly more than standard sleep education. The study was published in the July 2008 issue of the journal Sleep.

Stroke. In 136 patients who’d had a stroke at least six months earlier, 12 weeks of tai chi improved standing balance more than a general exercise program that entailed breathing, stretching, and mobilizing muscles and joints involved in sitting and walking. Findings were published in the January 2009 issue of Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair.